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Showing posts from June, 2014

Boutis Tabletopper Reaches the Finish Line

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Central to this tabletopper is the floral boutis pattern designed by Mme. Francine Born of "Boutis Provence" (www.boutis.fr) that I stitched in a class on boutis with Mme. Born several summers ago in Montpellier, France. The linen/cotton surround is there to provide a framework to the boutis.


After the initial FMQ was completed, the tabletopper lacked energy and life. The particular linen I chose for this project presented a greater challenge then I had anticipated (see my post of May 23/14 http://seamsfrench.blogspot.ca/2014/05/traditional-boutis-meets-fmq.html). Other then removing the boutis from the background and starting again, (which was a less then thrilling prospect), I have tried to give warmth to the piece by embellishing it with contrasting embroidery threads, and, to add some relief, I have filled in the background with a small stipple stitch.

After the initial round of quilting, the stitches completed disappeared into the linen with the very fine tone on t…

Colourful Interlude

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These lush, rich fuchsias and roses on our balcony patio have inspired me to dig deep into the stash and hunt up some of the most colourful and lively fabrics and trims that I could find.



Since most of my stitching time has focused on boutis recently, which is worked mostly on whites and neutrals, a therapy session using the brightest and most vibrant colours from the stash is most welcome.

These fun fabrics are a lightly laminated cotton that I found in my favourite kitchen shop in Montpellier. I had mailed them (as well as the coordinating bindings)  home several years ago, but because we have never spent a summer in Vancouver, there was never an urgency to dig them out before now.  They will help add a little southern French sunshine to our Vancouver summer.





And now ... the leftovers. My favourite! From what was left over after cutting the two tablecloths, I managed to get 16 place mats cut. The yellow scraps were still a leftover from Montpellier. Thank goodness these leftovers …